Pediatric Fellowship Programs

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The Department of Pediatrics at the University of Minnesota promotes excellence in academic subspecialty training with an emphasis on producing academic leaders who generate the new knowledge required to provide the best care for infants, children, and adolescents. We will accomplish this through:

  • Recruiting fellows with outstanding academic potential and commitment.
  • Providing state-of-the-art clinical training.
  • Providing exceptional training and mentorship in basic, translational, clinical, and epidemiologic research, medical education, academic leadership, and advocacy for pediatric health.
  • Ensuring a scholarly work product during fellowship which serves to facilitate fellows' professional transition into academic faculty positions.

We are proud to offer medical fellowship programs in 16 subspecialties.  Learn more about each of our programs by clicking the gray tabs below.

Additional Resources

Subspecialties

Academic General Pediatrics

Academic General Pediatrics

Program Director
Dr. Iris Borowsky
borow004@umn.edu

Program Coordinator
Hannah Gaustad-Randolph
gaust013@umn.edu
(612) 625-2272
Room 353
717 Delaware St. SE

Fellowship Quick Facts

Accredited/Nonaccredited: Not applicable (no ACGME accreditation available for General Academic Pediatric fellowships currently)

# of fellow slots each year: Varies – typically 2

Typical academic year start date: September 1st

Funding: Ruth L. Kirschtein National Research Service Award (NRSA) Institutional Training Grants (T32), Health Resources and Services Administration, Bureau of Health Professions

Strengths of Program: The fellowship is designed to prepare pediatricians for leadership roles in the academic setting through the development of skills in research, education, program development, outcomes evaluation, policy and advocacy, with a focus on serving children from historically underserved communities. One of the great strengths of the fellowship is its outstanding research and teaching faculty. The General Pediatrics fellows also benefit from the large and multidisciplinary (medicine, psychology, nutrition, nursing) community of fellows in the Division, including fellows in Adolescent Health and Developmental/Behavioral Pediatrics.

General Schedule:

  • Clinical vs. Research: Most fellows spend 2 half-days per week doing clinical activities. Remainder of time devoted to fellowship didactics (leadership series), Masters degree coursework and research.
  • Call responsibilities: None.

Types of research fellows could pursue (e.g. lab, clinical, community-based, etc.): Clinical and community-based, including secondary data analyses, survey-based research, intervention evaluation, qualitative research, etc.

Dual Degree: Does your program fund Master’s Program? If so, which one(s)?
Yes, Masters in Public Health. Fellows can choose any degree program in the Public Health School.

Career Path: Where do your fellows go after fellowship?
Most enter academic positions nationally as clinician researchers.

Do you know of fellowship programs in your specialty that address Med-Peds graduates?
By their very nature, encompassing multiple areas of interest, General Academic Pediatric fellowships are accommodating to Med-Peds graduates. 

More information

Adolescent Health & Medicine

Adolescent Health & Medicine

Program Director
Dr. Nimi Singh
singh031@umn.edu

Program Coordinator
Hannah Gaustad-Randolph
gaust013@umn.edu
Phone: (612) 625-2272
Fax: (612) 626-2134
Adolescent Health & Medicine
717 Delaware Street SE, #353
Minneapolis, MN 55414-2959

Fellowship Quick Facts

Accredited/Nonaccredited: Accredited by ACGME

# of fellow slots each year: Up to 3 per year

Typical academic year start date: September 1st

Funding:

  1. Maternal and Child Health Bureau (Health Services and Research Administration, U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services), and
  2. Center for Disease Control and Prevention training grant (Healthy Youth Development Prevention Research Center).

Strengths of program: Our fellowship is a federally-funded interdisciplinary Leadership Education in Adolescent Health training program, which we’ve had in place for over 25 years. Our fellowship not only provides clinical training in Adolescent medicine, but is also heavily focused on the development of leadership skills, including teaching, research, public speaking, grant writing, and preparing data for the legislature regarding adolescent health issues. Our fellows are closely mentored in identifying a research question, conducting data analysis, writing up and submitting their research for presentation at professional meetings and publication in peer-reviewed journals (one manuscript per year). We expect our fellows to choose careers in either academia, public health or in other sectors that allow them to impact on adolescent health well beyond the individual clinician-patient encounter. All our medical fellows pursue a Masters in Public Health as part of their fellowship (if they have not already obtained this degree as part of their training).

General Schedule:

  • Clinical vs. Research – One full year (ten half-days a week for 48 weeks) of outpatient clinical duties, and two full years of Masters in Public Health coursework (including research), completed during a three-year fellowship. For example, two half-days of clinic the first year, three half-days of clinic the second year, and five half-days of clinic the third year, with the remainder of the time devoted to MPH coursework and research.
  • Call responsibilities - none

Types of research fellows could pursue (e.g. lab, clinical, community-based, etc.):
Clinical and epidemiological (public health, clinical, behavioral, etc..).

Dual Degree:
Does your program fund Master’s Program? If so, which one(s)?
 Adolescent Medicine fellows are required by our funding agency (Maternal and Child Health Bureau) to complete a Master’s in Public Health (MPH) degree during fellowship training. Application to the MPH degree program is a separate application process from the fellowship application. Note: all of our fellows who apply to the MPH program in the School of Public Health have been accepted to the program, to date.

Career Path:
Where do your fellows go after fellowship?
 Fellowship graduates who have continued in academic settings enjoy careers combining clinical care, research, teaching and administration. Examples: Peter Scal, Assistant Professor, University of Minnesota (Dept of Pediatrics); Julia Joseph-DiCaprio, Chief of Pediatrics, Hennepin County Medical Center; David Rosen, Director of Adolescent Medicine, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor; Naomi Duke, Assistant Professor, Vanderbilt Children’s Hospital; Sarah Lerand, Assistant Professor, Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.

Fellowship graduates working in primary care clinical settings are often involved in administration, research and/or teaching as well (Eric Meininger, CUHCC; Amy Kelly, College of St Catherine’s Health and Wellness Center; Allison Warford, Boynton Health Service; Ellen Rock, Eating Disorders Institute at Methodist Hospital).

Do you know of fellowship programs in your specialty that address Med-Peds graduates? Our fellowship program accepts Med-Peds graduates. We encourage them to pursue a full three-year fellowship in order to successfully complete the research/ scholarship requirements.

Additional Information: If you are interested in such a fellowship, please do look at our website, and if you have any questions after reviewing this site, please do not hesitate to contact us further. Contact Hannah Gaustad-Randolph, our program coordinator, at gaust013@umn.edu.

More Information

Blood and Marrow Transplantation (BMT)

Blood and Marrow Transplantation (BMT)

Program Director
Dr. Angie Smith
smith719@umn.edu

Program Coordinator
Kelly Miettunen
landb018@umn.edu
(612) 626-5678
8484B (Campus Delivery Code)

Fellowship Quick Facts

Accredited/Nonaccredited: Not applicable (no accreditation available for Bone & Marrow Transplantation Pediatric fellowships currently)

# of fellow slots each year: 1-2

Typical academic year start date: July 1st

Funding: NIH training grant, private funding, affiliate funding

Strengths of program:

  • Nationally/internationally recognized clinical and basic science investigators providing fellows with exposure to a wide variety of diseases but also multiple conditioning regimens and bone marrow sources including double and triple umbilical cord blood transplants
  • One of the largest blood and marrow transplant programs in the United States with national and international referrals.
  • The University of Minnesota Cancer Center, one of only thirty-five NCI designated Comprehensive Cancer Centers in the United States.

Overview of General Schedule:
In total, the BMT fellow will spend 9 months among the BMT inpatient and outpatient services with the remaining 3 months spent participating in research activities with BMT faculty.

Types of research fellows could pursue (i .g. lab, clinical, community-based, etc.):
It is the belief of all members of the section that basic biological and clinical research is as important in Pediatric BMT as is the care of those children in the clinic. The fellowship seeks to train clinicians in such a manner that they are able to propose and answer scientific questions, which might not be obvious to either the basic scientist or clinician alone. Thus, the integration of clinical science and basic laboratory science are of vital importance to this training program. To this end, fellows are supported in the further development of research skills established during their prior training in Pediatric Hematology/Oncology. Their research in a focused area, in the future, throughout his or her research career, contribute to the continued advancement of the BMT field as a whole.

Career Path: Where do your fellows go after fellowship?
The fellowship in Pediatric BMT is intended to prepare physicians for careers in academia. Our past trainees hold faculty positions in many of the top programs in the country and remain active in clinical, translational or basic research. Our fellows are highly sought after for positions upon completion of their training.

Do you know of fellowship programs in your specialty that address Med-Peds graduates?
Pediatric BMT is an excellent choice of subspecialty for graduates of med/peds programs as the treatment of adolescents and young adults is a rapidly expanding area of expertise within BMT. The majority of our treatment protocols include eligibility of young adults.

Additional Information: The practice opportunities are tremendous, as are the rewards of successfully treating children with potentially life-threatening diseases. The field is changing rapidly with new advancements coming to the forefront of clinical care and providing new treatment options making it a very exciting field of medicine for fellowship graduates to enter.

More Information

Cardiology

Cardiology

Program Director
Dr. Elizabeth Braunlin
braun002@umn.edu

Program Coordinator
Ellen Jeffery
sull0380@umn.edu
(612) 626-2958
8952B (Campus Delivery Code)

Fellowship Quick Facts

Accredited/Nonaccredited: Accredited by ACGME

# of fellow slots each year: 2

Typical academic year start date: July 1st

Funding: Affiliate Hospital Funding, Division Support

Strengths of program:

  • Strong clinical program – echo, interventional catheterization, transplant
  • Strong research – hyperlipidemia, devices, developmental cardiology

General Schedule:

  • Clinical vs. Research: 19 months clinical – 18 of which occur in first 2 years; 17 months research – third year
  • Call responsibilities: 1:4 from home years 1 and 2 (22 months); 1:4 in house call during ICU rotation years 1 and 2 (2 months); 1:5 from home year 3 (12 months)
  • Types of research fellows could pursue (e.g. lab, clinical, community-based, etc.): All types available

Dual Degree:
Does your program fund Master’s Program?
 If so, which one(s)? Could be arranged – MS Clinical Research

Career Path:
Where do your fellows go after fellowship?
 Academic positions

Do you know of fellowship programs in your specialty that address Med-Peds graduates? Yes

Additional Information: If you are interested in learning more about Pediatric Cardiology Fellowship, please contact Elizabeth Braunlin at braun002@umn.edu or Ellen Jeffery at sull0380@umn.edu

More Information

Child Abuse Pediatrics

Child Abuse Pediatrics

Program Director
Dr. Nancy Harper
nsharper@umn.edu

Program Coordinator
Sandra Streff
streff@umn.edu  
612-624-8903

More Information

Critical Care

Critical Care

Program Director
Dr. Marie Steiner
stein083@umn.edu

Program Coordinator
Linda Linnerud
linne009@umn.edu
(612) 625-9950
8951G (Campus Delivery Code)

More Information

Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrics

Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrics

Program Director
Andrew J. Barnes, MD, MPH
drbarnes@umn.edu

Program Coordinator
Hannah Gaustad-Randolph
gaust013@umn.edu
Phone: (612) 625-2272
Fax: (612) 626-2134
Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrics
717 Delaware Street SE, #353
Minneapolis, MN 55414-2959

Fellowship Quick Facts

Accredited/Nonaccredited: Accredited by ACGME

# of fellow slots each year: 1

Typical academic year start date: September 1st

Funding: Affilate site funding; Divisional support; Departmental support; Maternal and Child Health Bureau

Strengths of program:

  • Longevity and innovation — One of the longest-running DBP fellowship programs in the US
  • Comprehensive — Practical — Deep and Broad
  • Strong community integration
  • Outstanding interprofessional leadership, research, and career development opportunities with LEND and LEAH programs

General Schedule:

  • Clinical vs. Research – DBP clinics and consults 40%; Elective clinics 10%; Research 40%; Didactics 10%
  • Call responsibilities - None

Types of research fellows could pursue: Ongoing, active areas of research include:

  • Risk and protective factors as they relate to child and adolescent development and behavior
  • Translational research on stress, resilience, and self-regulation in children
  • Clinical research on pediatric behavioral disorders, autism spectrum, and neurodevelopmental disorders
  • Community-based research among children and youth who have experienced severe adversity
  • Lab opportunities include developmental studies that incorporate fMRI, ERP, executive function, attachment and parent-child interactions, body composition and nutritional status, and/or biomarkers of HPA activity, immune-inflammatory response, electrophysiology, and gene-environment interactions
  • Educational and Curricular research in DBP, primary care, and child social-emotional health
  • Policy and advocacy work with ASD, neurodevelopmental disabilities, early childhood, bullying, etc.

Career Path:

Where do your fellows go after fellowship?  Academic DBP 60%; Private/group clinical DBP practice 40%

Do you know of fellowship programs in your specialty that address Med-Peds graduates? Our fellowship program accepts Med-Peds graduates, and we have active clinical, teaching, and research programs that would be of special interest to Med-Peds graduates, e.g. transition to adulthood for youth with neurodevelopmental disabilities and/or chronic medical conditions.

Dual Degree:

Does your program fund a Master’s Program? Funding in whole or in part for degree-seeking coursework can be arranged on a case-by-case basis (possibilities include public health, child psychology, social work, bioethics, health informatics, prevention science)

Please Note:

  • Applicants must have completed an ACGME accredited residency program by the fellowship start date. 
  • We accept only applicants who are U.S. citizens or permanent residents (green card holders), or those who have a J-1 Visa.

Additional Information: Please feel free to contact our Program Coordinator, Hannnah Gaustad-Randolph, gaust013@umn.edu. We are happy to furnish names and contact info  of our faculty, former or current fellows, or community members for you to discuss the any aspect of the program further.

More Information

Endocrinology

Endocrinology

Program Director
Dr. Brandon Nathan
natha039@umn.edu

Program Coordinator
Ellen Jeffery
sull0380@umn.edu
(612) 626-2958
8952B (Campus Delivery Code)

Fellowship Quick Facts

Accredited/Nonaccredited: Accredited by ACGME

# of fellow slots each year: 1

Funding: T32 NIH-funded training grant (Trainee must be a citizen or a non-citizen national of the United States.)

Strengths of the program: Our program is well-rounded, providing outstanding opportunities in both clinical care and research in preparation for an academic career as a board-certified Pediatric Endocrinologist. The program provides the fellow with an opportunity to obtain a Masters Degree in Clinical Research through the School of Public Health. The faculty members are engaged in a number of clinical and bench research studies providing excellent opportunities for fellow research. Fellows receive an excellent exposure to the breadth of clinical problems encountered in pediatric endocrinology. The faculty is committed to the education and development of fellows.

General schedule:

  • Clinical vs. research – Fellows complete 4 months on the inpatient clinical service each year. Outpatient clinics continue throughout all 3 years and consist of alternating half-day clinics of either general endocrinology or diabetes each week. Additional outpatient opportunities are available in the metabolism clinic and adult diabetes and endocrinology clinics. The remaining non-clinical time is devoted to the fellow’s research activities and other academic pursuits (conferences, seminars, diabetes camp, education).
  • Call responsibilities – Call is strictly from home with rare situations requiring an after-hours visit to the hospital. Fellows take call during the week and every other weekend while on service.

Types of research fellows can pursue: both clinical and bench research opportunities are available within and outside the Division. Recent research experience has included:

  • Effects of chronic hypoglycemia on brain glucose metabolism in adults with type 1 diabetes
  • Metabolic outcome of islet cell transplant for type 1 diabetes and autoislet transplantation in patients with pancreatectomy for pancreatitis
  • Prevalence of urinary incontinence in obese female adolescence
  • Correlation of surrogate of measures of insulin resistance and insulin clamp studies
  • Endocrine sequelae in patients with Hurler syndrome following BMT

Dual degree: Does your program fund Master’s program? If so, which one(s)? Yes, Masters in Clinical Research – fellows enrolled in this Program complete their coursework throughout the length of their three-year fellowship, culminating in a master’s thesis and oral presentation in year-3.

Career path: Where do your fellows go after fellowship? Recent fellows have been successful in obtaining desirable academic and private practice opportunities within the state of Minnesota and elsewhere in the country.

Additional Information: Despite the relatively short history of the Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetes Fellowship Program at the University of Minnesota, it has rapidly developed into a comprehensive and academically stimulating program that continues to evolve and strives to become one of the best training programs in the country.

More Information

Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition

Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition

Program Director
Dr. Alan Baldridge
adbmd@umn.edu

Program Coordinator
Jane Cattell
catte008@umn.edu
(612) 626-4278
8952C (Campus Delivery Code)

Fellowship Quick Facts

Accredited/Nonaccredited: Accredited by ACGME

# of fellow slots each year: 1

Typical academic year start date: July 1st

Funding: Affiliate Funding, Grants

Strengths of program:

  • In existence for over 25 years
  • Long-standing clinical and research collaborations established with several subspecialties within the department of pediatrics.
  • Our division has an internationally recognized expertise in pediatric liver disease, liver transplantation, pathology, inherited metabolic disorders, and complications of all transplantation procedures.
  • The division sees the entire spectrum of gastrointestinal and pancreatic diseases.

General Schedule:

Clinical vs. Research- The three-year program is divided into one year of clinical training (usually divided over the first two years) and two years of clinical or basic research experience during which time there are only minimal clinical responsibilities.
Call responsibilities- We abide by the rules of on call coverage.

Types of research fellows could pursue (e.g. lab, clinical, community-based, etc.): Clinical

Dual Degree: Does your program fund Master’s Program? If so, which one(s)? Yes – Masters in Clinical Research

Career Path: Where do your fellows go after fellowship? Graduates of our program are currently on the faculty of a number of academic pediatric institutions throughout the country.

More Information

Hematology and Oncology

Hematology and Oncology

Program Director
Dr. Emily Greengard
emilyg@umn.edu

Program Coordinator

Rick Jacobson
rickj@umn.edu
(612) 626-5501
8366C (Campus Delivery Code)

Fellowship Quick Facts

Accredited/Nonaccredited: Accredited by ACGME

# of fellow slots each year: 2

Typical academic year start date: July 1st

Funding: NIH training grant, private funding, affiliate funding

Strengths of program:

  • Nationally/internationally recognized clinical and basic science investigators with a wide range of research interests and expertise including molecular biology, bone marrow transplant, biology, growth factors, cancer etiology, and health-related outcomes.
  • One of the largest blood and marrow transplant programs in the United States with national and international referrals.
  • One of twenty Children’s Oncology Group NCI sponsored Phase I centers.
  • The University of Minnesota Cancer Center, one of only thirty-five NCI designated Comprehensive Cancer Centers in the United States.
  • One of the largest and most active member institutions in the Children’s Oncology Group with many of the faculty holding leadership roles.

Overview of General Schedule:

The fellowship in pediatric hematology/oncology provides an opportunity for pediatricians to become board-certified pediatric hematologists/oncologists.

Year 1 of the fellowship is designed to develop clinical skills through direct inpatient and outpatient care. In addition, fellows supervise and teach pediatric residents in the care of hospitalized pediatric hematology/oncology and blood and marrow transplant patients. During the first year fellows will be assigned as the primary physician of 10-20 newly diagnosed patients whom they will follow for the three years of the fellowship. Opportunities are provided for fellows to:

  • Spend time in research settings to investigate possible research programs for years 2-3.
  • Engage in concentrated learning in the areas of coagulation, hematopathology, blood banking, and cell processing, radiation oncology, palliative care.
  • See patients one half day each week in the oncology and blood and marrow transplant outpatient clinics.
  • Attend weekly research and oncology-related conferences.
  • Conduct clinical research projects.

Years 2-3 of the fellowship are devoted primarily to research training. The program offers two distinct research tracks, focusing on either (1) laboratory research or (2) clinical research. Based on the fellow’s long-term academic career objectives and interests, selection of the research track and specific research projects are made, by the fellow in conjunction with their faculty advisors and future research mentors, prior to the end of the first year of fellowship.

Types of research fellows could pursue (i .g. lab, clinical, community-based, etc.):

It is the belief of all members of the section that basic biological and clinical research is as important in Pediatric Hematology/Oncology/BMT as is the care of those children in the clinic. The fellowship seeks to train clinicians in such a manner that they are able to propose and answer basic scientific questions, which might not be obvious to either the basic scientist or clinician alone. Thus, the integration of clinical science and basic laboratory science are of vital importance to this training program. To this end, fellows are supported in the development of research skills in any one of multiple areas with the goal that the fellow, in the future, will throughout his or her research, contribute to the continued advancement of the field as a whole.

To accomplish this in the relatively short time of the fellowship is difficult and requires a focused effort on the part of the fellow and the division staff. To this end the fellow may spend one or two months during the first year rotating through various laboratories and working toward the identification of a project/field that he/she will concentrate on during the second and third years. One NIH training grant to support post-doctoral research training in cancer epidemiology/clinical research is also available to provide additional research opportunities and support.

During the second and third years the fellow will be primarily responsible for his/her research to the virtual exclusion of other non-research efforts (with the exceptions of one morning per week in clinic, required conferences and a limited amount of clinical service). An opportunity exists for a fourth year of research training in some instances.

It is required that this research project progress towards publishable reports for this original investigation before the conclusion of the fellowship and form a foundation from which the investigator can continue in the future. It is further expected that local and perhaps national funding be sought during the second and third year as part of evidence of research progress and as part of research "training". Thus, our overall goal is to produce clinical and basic science research investigators to join the academic ranks.

Dual Degree: Does your program fund Master’s Program? If so, which one(s)?

The option of a fellowship research training program in clinical research which includes obtaining an MS in Clinical Research from the Graduate School or an MPH in Epidemiology from the School of Public Health is a research pathway in our program. Tuition for this is paid by the program.

Career Path: Where do your fellows go after fellowship?

The fellowship in Pediatric Hematology/Oncology/BMT is intended to prepare physicians for careers in academic Pediatric Hematology/Oncology/BMT. Our past trainees hold faculty positions in many of the top programs in the country and remain active in clinical, translational or basic research. Our fellows are highly sought after for positions upon completion of their training.

Do you know of fellowship programs in your specialty that address Med-Peds graduates?

Pediatric Hematology/Oncology is an excellent choice of subspecialty for graduates of med/peds programs as the treatment of adolescents and young adults is a rapidly expanding area of expertise within hematology/oncology. The majority of our treatment protocols include eligibility of young adults and certainly the care of hematologic diseases such as sickly cell anemia and hemophilia spans the lifetime of the patient.

Additional Information: The practice opportunities in pediatric hematology/oncology are tremendous as are the rewards of successfully treating children with potentially life-threatening diseases. The field is changing rapidly with new advancements coming to the forefront of clinical care and providing new treatment options making it a very exciting field of medicine for residency graduates to enter.

More Information

Hospital Medicine

Hospital Medicine

Program Director
Bazak Sharon, MD
sharo011@umn.edu

Program Coordinator
Lindsey Christ
byra0002@umn.edu

Fellowship Quick Facts

Accredited/Non-Accredited: Non-ACGME accredited (*)

Number of fellowship positions each year: 1

Duration of fellowship: 2 years

Typical academic year start date: July 8th

Funding: This derives from a combination of each fellow’s independent clinical service time in a community hospital (total of 18 weeks equivalent during the 2-year fellowship), plus Hospitalist division support.

Applicants must be Board eligible/Board certified (BE/BC) in Pediatrics.

Strength of Program:

  • The fellowship program’s triple mission is to provide excellent training and experience in a broad range of skills necessary to the practice of Pediatric Hospital Medicine (PHM), while cultivating strong scholarly and leadership skills.  Fellows will be well-prepared to launch into leadership roles and academic careers within pediatric hospital medicine.
  • Dedicated mentorship from our large faculty with variety of expertise in clinical, research, quality and safety, education, and administrative areas
  • Clinical experience in a large academic tertiary care hospital as well as in community hospital setting, including Level I (newborn nursery) and Level II (step down NICU) settings
  • A wide variety of Pediatric fellowship programs that provides all fellows with robust common curriculum
  • Strong partnerships with many specialists at our organization in which fellows may elect to spend extra time, including (but not limited to): PICU and NICU, pediatric emergency medicine and surgical specialties, child abuse, pain and palliative care, and anesthesia
  • A wide range of opportunities for research and scholarly activities and access to state-of-the art research throughout the University of Minnesota

General Schedule: Two-year fellowship will include an estimated 28 weeks of mentored clinical experience in an academic free-standing children’s hospital, 50 weeks of research/scholarly activity, 18 weeks of independent clinical duties in an affiliated community hospital, and 8 weeks of paid time off (PTO).

Year

Mentored Clinical Time

Research/Scholarly Time

Independent Clinical Duties

PTO

I

20 weeks

22 weeks

6 weeks

4 weeks

II

8 weeks

28 weeks

12 weeks

4 weeks

 

Call responsibilities: Dependent on each clinical rotation. PICU and NICU rotation: Weekends and overnight calls. General Pediatric rotations: Fellows will have some off-site pager calls responsibilities. Independent clinical duties: Similar schedule to PHM faculty with weekend rounding and fair balance of daytime and nighttime shifts. No call responsibility during research/scholarly rotations.

Types of research PHM fellows could pursue: There is a plethora of research and scholarly activities which are available to trainees, based on individual interest. Research opportunities include basic bench projects, translational and clinical research, quality improvement and patient safety projects.  Scholarly activities may also involve medical education/curricular development, hospital administration, or various areas of advocacy at the local or state levels. 

Each fellow will spend 10-12 weeks during the first 6 months of fellowship to formally meet with various faculty members from the PHM division, Department of Pediatrics, the University of Minnesota medical school, and throughout the community in the Twin Cities in order to identify potential mentors.  It is expected that by the end of the first six months of fellowship that each fellow will have defined and begun to work on their scholarly project.

Career Path: Graduates of the program will be prepared to work in any pediatric hospitalist practice, at tertiary care or community settings.  They will be well-versed in caring for children with acute or acute-on-chronic diseases, Level I and Level II nursery settings, sedation services, and will be comfortable with the full range of common hospitalist procedures.  Graduating fellows will have the skills to enter academic positions and conduct independent research or other high-level scholarly activities in areas such as medical education, QI/QA, patient safety or advocacy.  Graduates will learn administrative skills helpful in pursuing a career path in hospital leadership roles.

Additional information: The American Board of Pediatrics (ABP) has recognized PHM as a subspecialty. ACGME accreditation for the field of pediatric hospital medicine is pending and under review by the American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS).  The University of Minnesota Department of Pediatrics is in-line with current national standards of PHM fellowship programs and is fully prepared to receive accreditation when ABMS recognition is granted. Graduates will be eligible to sit for the PHM board exam upon full accreditation of the field.

More Information

Infectious Diseases

Infectious Diseases

Program Director
Dr. Mark Schleiss
schleiss@umn.edu

Program Coordinator
Lindsey Christ
pedsid@umn.edu
(612) 626-2710
8952A (Campus Delivery Code)

Fellowship Quick Facts

Accredited/Nonaccredited: Accredited by ACGME

# of fellow slots each year: 1

Typical academic year start date: July 1st

Funding: Grants, Affiliate Funding, Division Support

Strengths of program: The overriding goal of the Pediatric infectious Diseases Fellowship program is to provide excellent training in the practice and science of infectious disease and in infectious diseases-related research skills through mentored relationships involving progressive independence for the fellow.

General Schedule:

  • Year 1: 24 weeks of clinical time, 24 weeks of research, and 4 weeks of personal time off (PTO)
  • Year 2: 12 weeks of clinical time, 36 weeks of research, and 4 weeks of PTO
  • Year 3: 12 weeks of clinical time, 36 weeks of research, and 4 weeks of PTO

Call responsibilities: In-house call is defined as those duty hours beyond the normal work day when fellows are required to be immediately available in the assigned institution. In-house call must occur no more frequently than every third night averaged over a 4-hour period.

Evening and weekend calls are most always directed first to the attending physician and not the fellow. Fellows are on service 31 day periods, but patient care and related consultation time averages 40-50 hours per week and would never exceed 60 hours. Call is never taken in the hospital on nights and weekends.

Types of research fellows could pursue (e.g. lab, clinical, community-based, etc.):

The trainee (fellow) meets formally during the first months of training with Division faculty to discuss research goals and possible projects. Following these one-on-one discussions, the trainee will choose a mentor, and start development of a formal laboratory or patient-oriented research project. The outline for this project will be completed before the end of the first year, and then implemented during the second and third years. In some cases, implementation can begin during the first year of training. By the end of the training period, the trainee will have presented the results of the research at a national meeting (such as SPR, ICAAC, or IDSA), prepared a manuscript for publication, under the supervision of their mentor, and prepared a research grant application for external funding.

Throughout the three years of training, the trainee will receive informal and formal training in research methodology, research ethics, biostatistics, scientific publication preparation, and grant writing. It is expected that trainees will acquire the skills to submit strong applications for grant funding.

Dual Degree: Does your program fund Master’s Program? If so, which one(s)?

Fellows wishing to pursue training in epidemiology or clinical trials may obtain a concurrent MPH degree in the School of Public Health. The program also trains post-doctoral PhD scientist in microbial pathogenesis and developmental immunology.

Career Path: Where do your fellows go after fellowship?

Physician graduates of pediatric residency programs are prepared for board eligibility in Pediatric Infectious Diseases and careers in academic pediatric infectious diseases. Trainees pursue patient-oriented or laboratory research, develops medical educations skills, and provides clinical subspecialty care to patients. Clinical rotations include two children’s hospitals, and emphasize training in diagnosis and management of common childhood infections in the immunocompomised host and pediatric HIV in both inpatient and out patient settings.

Additional Information: The Department of Pediatrics of the University of Minnesota and its integrated hospitals have a long-standing tradition of excellence in the medical care of children and in the enhancement of this care through research and education. The faculty of this department are committed to the continuation of all elements of this tradition. The purpose of our pediatric fellowship program is derived from the central mission of this faculty to provide optimal health care for children. An integral part of this mission is the training of pediatricians fully equipped to perpetuate and advance the skills and knowledge necessary for this provision of quality care to the children of this region and beyond.

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Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine

Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine

Program Director
Dr. Cathy Bendel
bende001@umn.edu

Program Coordinator
Ellen Jeffery
sull0380@umn.edu
(612) 626-2958
8952B (Campus Delivery Code)

Fellowship Quick Facts

Accredited/Nonaccredited: Accredited by ACGME

Number of fellow slots each year: 2

Typical academic year start date: July 1

Funding: Variable

Strengths of Program:

  • Strong clinical training with exposure to both quaternary academic and busy private practice neonatology.
  • Multiple areas for research and scholarly activity.

General Schedule:

  • Clinical vs. Research: 12-15 mo. clinical; 21-24 mo. research
  • Call Responsibilities: 3-6 nights per month

Types of research fellows could pursue: Laboratory studies in pulmonary mechanics, nutrition, brain development, iron metabolism and infectious diseases; clinical research in neurodevelopmental outcomes and resuscitation Vermont Oxford projects; education, research in simulation studies

Dual Degree:
Does your program fund a Master's Program? If so, which one(s)?
 Consideration is given on an individual basis for funding of graduate studies.  Possibilities include, but are not limited to: Master's in Public Health, Master's in Health Informatics, Master's in Bioethics.

Career Path:
Where do your fellows go after fellowship?
 Academic neonatology 60%; clinical/private practice neonatology 40%.

Additional Information:

Please feel free to contact Dr. Catherine Bendel or Ellen Jeffery with questions.

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Nephrology

Nephrology

Program Director
Dr. Clifford Kashtan
kasht001@umn.edu

Program Coordinator
Lindsey Christ
pnfellow@umn.edu
(612) 626-2710
8952A (Campus Delivery Code)

Fellowship Quick Facts

Accredited/Nonaccredited: Accredited by ACGME

Number of fellow slots each year: 3

Typical academic year start date: July 1

Funding: National Institutes of Health grant DK-007087

Strengths of Program:

  • Track Record - 100 graduates, 80% in academic pediatric nephrology, many division heads and funded investigators
  • Large faculty with variety of research interests
  • Diverse clinical population with very strong training in end-stage renal disease and transplantation

General Schedule:

  • Clinical vs. Research - 11 months clinical, 25 months research
  • Call Responsibilities - beeper call when on clinical rotations; at least 2 weekends off/clinical month weekend call ~ 18/year

Types of research fellows could pursue (e.g. lab, clinical, community-based, etc.): Unrestricted - any research activity that satisfies ACGME and ABP requirements and promotes acquisition of fundamental research skills is potentially acceptable.

Dual Degree:
Does your program fund a Master's Program? If so, which one(s)?
 The program has assisted fellows in the Masters of Clinical Research program. This depends on the availability of funds.

Career Path:
Where do your fellows go after fellowship?
 They are recruited to academic positions in pediatric nephrology.

Do you know of fellowship programs in your specialty that address Med-Peds graduates? There are programs that have participated in combined Med-Peds nephrology training.

Additional Information:

Pediatric nephrology may be for you if you:

  • Enjoy intellectual challenges
  • Like having the answers when no one else does
  • Want to make desperately ill children well
  • Are looking for an area offering a wide range of important unanswered questions that are ripe for investigation

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Pulmonology

Pulmonology

Program Director
Dr. William Gershan
wgershan@umn.edu
Office: (612) 626-2916

Program Coordinator
Lindsey Christ
byra0002@umn.edu 
Office: (612) 626­-2710

Fellowship Quick Facts

Accredited/Nonaccredited: Accredited by ACGME

Number of fellow slots each year: 1

Funding: Divisional support, National foundations

Strengths of program:

  • Established in 1986 as one of the first approved pulmonary fellowship programs in the country
  • Selective to assure that each successful candidate will have the mentoring and access to facilities and patients that they need to assure their success in mastering clinical practice, in becoming proficient educators, and in generating new knowledge and advancing the field.
  • Multiple regional and national collaborations.

General Schedule:

  • Clinical vs. Research - 18-20 months clinical
  • Call Responsibilities - In house when on NICU and PICU, from home otherwise

Types of research fellows could pursue (e.g. lab, clinical, community-based, etc.):

  • Laboratory: airway injury, oxygen sensing and lung development
  • Clinical: infant pulmonary function measurment in cystic fibrosis, asthma, chronic lung disease of infancy, neuromuscular disorders

Dual Degree:
Does your program fund Master's Program?
 No

Career Path:
Where do your fellows go after fellowship? 
More than 75% are full time clinical or tenured faculty and enjoy consultative practice, teaching and research.

Do you know of fellowship programs in your specialty program that address Med/Peds graduates? Yes, training in both adult and pediatric pulmonary may be possible.  Please contact us if you are interested in a combined program. 

Additional Information: You'll enjoy the challenge!

For further information:
http://www.pediatrics.umn.edu/divisions/pulmonary-and-sleep-medicine/education

Rheumatology

Rheumatology

Program Director
Dr. Bryce Binstadt
binstadt@umn.edu

Program Coordinator
Sandra Streff
streff@umn.edu
(612) 625-6678

Fellowship Quick Facts

Accredited/Nonaccredited: ACGME accredited since 2009

# of fellow slots each year: 1

Total # of fellows currently: 1

Typical academic year start date: July 1

Funding: Fairview (FTEs), Charitable funding through UMF, and from the Rheumatology Research Foundation

Strengths of program:

  • Strong clinical training in an academic, pediatric tertiary care setting: University of Minnesota Masonic Children’s Hospital.
  • High-volume outpatient and infusion center visits.
  • Wide range of opportunities for basic or clinical research.

General Schedule:

  • Clinical vs. Research: 1st year clinical; 2nd and 3rd years research with ½ day/week of clinic.
  • Call responsibilities: One week every three weeks. No in-house call.

Types of research fellows could pursue (e.g. lab, clinical, community-based, etc.): Clinical or Basic Research

Dual Degree:
Does your program fund Master’s Program? If so, which one(s)? Masters of Clinical Research & MPH

Career Path:
Where do your fellows go after fellowship? 
Our young program has three graduates. Two are faculty members at the University of Minnesota, and one is at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota.

Do you know of fellowship programs in your specialty that address Med-Peds graduates? The American Board of Pediatrics and American Board of Internal Medicine provide a mechanism for dual certification. Dual training paths need to be planned on an individual basis with the Directors of both Programs.

Additional Information: Interested residents are encouraged to contact the Program Director early in their decision-making process. Dr. Bryce Binstadt, the Program Director, can be reached by e-mail: binstadt@umn.edu.

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