Current Pediatric Epidemiology Fellows

Pre-Doctoral Fellows

Aubrey Hubbard, MPH hubbard

hubba208@umn.edu 

Aubrey received her MPH in Epidemiology from The George Washington University in May 2016. During her degree, she conducted data analysis on genetic data for the Diabetes Prevention Program and immediately following she transitioned into data collection and management for clinical trials to prevent preterm birth.  She began her fellowship training and PhD in Fall of 2017.  Her primary research interests are in the genetic and epi-genetic etiology of childhood cancers and further exploration of the link between childhood cancer and very low birthweight.  She will be researching these topics under Dr. Poynter.

Post-Doctoral Fellows

Patrick Basile, MD Headshot of Dr. Patrick Basile, smiling

pbasile@umn.edu

I am currently a fellow in the Division of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology and Bone Marrow Transplant at the University of Minnesota. After earning my medical degree from Saint Louis University School of Medicine in St. Louis, MO, I completed residency at Joint Program Wright-Patterson Air Force Base/Wright State University in Dayton, OH as an active duty member of the US Air Force. I practiced as a general pediatrician for the USAF for 5 years at Offutt AFB in Omaha, NE. After being the primary care provider for several patients diagnosed with malignancies and other benign hematologic conditions, I returned to training to focus my career on pediatric hematology and oncology as well as gain further experience in academia and research. My current research, under the mentorship of Drs. Peter Gordon and David Largaespada is focused on the role of the CNS microenvironment on pediatric leukemia. 

Anne Sarver, PhD Anne Sarver

annes@umn.edu

Anne E. Sarver, Ph.D. is a fellow in Translational Pediatric Cancer Epidemiology at the University of Minnesota in the Department of Pediatrics. She earned her Ph.D. in Chemistry and Chemical Biology from the University of California San Francisco, where she focused on characterizing a novel drug target in Giardia lamblia. Dr. Sarver then spent a decade working as a Scientist in the bioinformatics software industry at Ingenuity Systems where she designed new content database models, expanded and refined ontologies, acquired and integrated new content, and analyzed large data sets using network and pathway analyses. Dr. Sarver decided to move back to academia to more actively participate in translational research and to drive discoveries that will significantly impact patients, particularly pediatric patients suffering from cancer. She is earning her Masters degree in Clinical Research at the University of Minnesota. Dr. Sarver's current research uses bioinformatics techniques to analyze large data sets with the goal of discovering treatments that promote more effective immune responses, either by targeting immunosuppressive factors in the tumor cells or by more effectively activating the patient’s existing immune response. Dr. Sarver's current collaborations include working with Drs. Subramanian, Modiano, Largaespada, and Spector as part of the Sobiech Osteosarcoma working group.

Lindsay Williams, PhD Lindsay Williams

almqu046@umn.edu

Lindsay A. Williams completed her PhD at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in the Department of Epidemiology. Mentored by Dr. Melissa Troester, she studied the molecular epidemiology of breast cancer by using traditional epidemiologic methods while incorporating novel data types including various tumor tissue gene expression signatures and digital image analysis of tumor tissue specimens. Her dissertation characterized etiologic differences in histologic and molecular subtypes of breast cancer with respect to reproductive risk factors.

Prior to attending UNC, Lindsay received her BS from Iowa State University in Biology with a minor in Statistics. She went on to complete her MPH at the University of Minnesota under the mentorship of Dr. Heather Nelson studying environmentally induced cancers. Then, she spent two years working at the International Epidemiology Institute with Dr. Bill Blot in Rockville, Maryland on the Southern Community Cohort Study. Her current work in childhood cancer, including germ cell tumors and acute lymphoblastic leukemia, focuses on identifying etiologic differences in histologic and molecular subtypes of both tumor types. Her primary mentors for her postdoctoral fellowship are Dr. Jenny Poynter and Dr. Logan Spector.

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