Pediatric Department Heads

Julius P. Sedgwick, MD

Julius P. Sedgwick, MD
1915-1923

Dr. Sedgwick was the first chief of the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Minnesota. He fiercely advocated for breastfeeding for all babies. Additionally, he focused on the prevention of infant deaths due to diseases like tuberculosis, which were of major concern at the time. 

Clemens von Pirquet MD

Clemens von Pirquet, MD
1923

When Dr. von Pirquet was hired to lead the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Minnesota, he was known worldwide for his research in bacteriology and immunology. He is known for coining the term "allergy" and creating a tuberculin skin test for people with tuberculosis, on top of pioneering studies of social, nutritional and public health in pediatrics. 

Frederick William Schlutz, MD

Frederick William Schlutz, MD
1924-1930

During his lifetime, Dr. Schlutz studied how nutrition, diet, and exercise affect children of all ages. He worked with immunization effectiveness against infectious diseases in infants and children as well as the nutritional effects of breastfeeding. 

Irvine McQuarrie, MD, PhD
1930-1955

Dr. McQuarrie was the first full-time chair of the Department of Pediatrics. His medical career included teaching, research, treatment and editing scientific literature. His time at the university was the cornerstone in Minnesota becoming the physician training powerhouse that it is today. This was due to Dr. McQuarrie's emphasis on the development of the academic careers of junior faculty. Today, the University of Minnesota honors Dr. McQuarrie's legacy by awarding outstanding young faculty members with the Irvine McQuarrie Award in order to further their research programs. 

Irvine McQuarrie, MD, PhD

John Adolph Anderson, MD, PhD
1955-1976

Dr. Anderson continued Dr. McQuarrie's work of making the University of Minnesota a front-runner in educating physicians. He was a Pediatric Endocrinologist who worked closely with Dr. McQuarrie, researching a large span of pediatric concerns from general child care to polio. Additionally, he worked to develop a formal Pediatric Endocrine Division and a central financing system within the Department of Pediatrics. 

John Adolph Anderson, MD, PhD

William Krivit, MD, PhD
1979-1986

Dr. Krivit was one of the co-founders of the Pediatric Blood and Marrow Transplant Program at the University of Minnesota - one of the first in the country - in the 1970s. During his time at the U, Dr. Krivit pioneered the treatment of children with metabolic storage disorders, trained more than 75 fellows and published hundreds of manuscripts on pediatric care, blood and marrow transplantation and hematology/oncology. He was a pioneer in research on solid tumors and launched one of the first randomized clinical trials on this malady. 

William Krivit, MD, PhD
Alfred Michael, MD

Alfred Michael, MD
1986-1997

Dr. Alfred Michael, a pediatric and kidney specialist, came to the University of Minnesota as a fellow in 1960 to work with immunologist Dr. Robert A. Good. In 1973, he became chief of the Immunopathogy Laboratory. He became a Regents' Professor and head of the Department of Pediatrics in 1986. Then, in 1997, Dr. Michael succeeded Dr. Frank Cerra as Dean on the Medical School. He resigned as dean in 2002. 

James H. Moller, MD

James H. Moller, MD
1997-2003

Dr. Moller has been at the University of Minnesota since 1959, many years in the Department of Pediatrics and, more recently, in the Department of Medicine. He served as chief of staff for the University of Minnesota Hospital for five years and as head of the Department of Pediatrics for seven years. Dr. Moller held the Paul F. Dwan Chair in Pediatric Cardiology for 30 years. His primary interest is congenital heart disease in children and adults, seeing patients in the outpatient setting. On a weekly basis, he reviews cardiac malformations with a small group of students and residents. Dr. Moller continues to write and edit books as he has throughout his career. 

John R Schrieber, MD, MPH

John R. Schrieber, MD, MPH
2004-2007

During his time at the University of Minnesota, Dr. Schreiber was the Ruben-Bentson Endowed Chair as well as professor and head of the Department of Pediatrics.He also held the rank of adjunct professor in the Department of Microbiology and Immunology. Dr. Schreiber's lab focused on infection and the immunology of infectious diseases. He played a crucial role in the opening of our University of Minnesota Masonic Children's Hospital. 

Aaron Friedman, MD
2008-2010

Dr. Friedman was head of the Department of Pediatrics and pediatrician-in-chief of our children's hospital from 2008-2010 when he accepted the role of Vice President for Health Sciences and Dean of the University of Minnesota Medical School. Dr. Friedman is a pediatric nephrologist and was recognized by the American Academy of Pediatrics with the Henry L. Barnett Award for his contributions to children suffering from kidney disease and to his work with the overall pediatric nephrology community. 

Aaron Friedman, MD

Joseph P. Neglia, MD, MPH
2010-Current

Dr. Neglia is the curent head of the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Minnesota Medical School and the physician-in-chief of University of Minnesota Masonic Children's Hospital. He holds the Ruben-Bentson Endowed Chair and has a joint appointment as Professor in the Department of Pediatrics and in the School of Public Health in the Division of Epidemiology and Community Health. He researches the long-term effects of cancer therapy in cancer survivors and the occurence of second malignancies following childhood cancer. He is nationally and internationally recognized for his contributions to the field of childhood cancer long-term effects. 

Joseph P. Neglia, MD, MPH